Saturday, 18 February 2017

Tasmanian Devils and Honeybrown Beetles

1. Tasmanian Devils Relaxing and Lazing Around ( Sarcophilus harrisii )

A while back uploaded a video of Tasmanian Devils fighting and feeding.
 (Here's the link: https://youtu.be/VE0013H7A0Y )

This video shows them relaxing and lazing around. Many of my videos are filmed "in the wild" so I need to mention that these were filmed at a wildlife park. Wild Tasmanian Devils are nocturnal however they do occasional take in the sun in forest clearings just like these ones.

( Tasmaninan Devil  - Click the play button)

2.  Honeybrown Beetle (Ecnolagria grandis)
 
This is the Honeybrown Beetle (Ecnolagria grandis) The following notes are from an old blog post of mine back in 2008.
The majority of Tenebrionids feed on dead plant material and fungi and many books and web sites say that E. grandis is also such a scavenger. Personally I had always assumed they were leaf eaters as I usually find them on a variety of native plants, especially on Eucalypts. Confused, I searched for more information and I found the paper listed below. This clearly states that they feed on fresh leaves of a variety of plants including, Brachychiton, and Leptospermum. While beetles were found on Eucalyptus spp, no mention is made of Eucalyptus being part of their diet so I will have to observe more closely the Honeybrown Beetles in my backyard. At least it confirms that they do in fact feed on living leaves. The adults of this species are short lived. Most of their life is spent in the larval stage underground. Perhaps it is at this stage that they feed on leaf litter.



(Honeybrown Beetle - Click the play button)




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Since September I've gone from about 12 subscribers on my YouTube channel to over 210. Thank you all very much for your support and encouragement. If you have not yet subscribed please consider doing so, as not all of my videos appear on this blog. If you are logged in with your google account you simply need to use the YouTube/Subscribe button below.

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References:
  • Hawkeswood T.J. & Turner J. R. (2003) Some notes on the biology, host plants and occurrence of the Australian lagrid beetle Ecnolagria grandis (Gyllenhal, 1817) (Coleoptera: Lagriidae). Spilopyra, 4: 1-3.


Friday, 10 February 2017

White-faced Heron and a Mole Cricket

1. White-faced Heron (Egretta novaehollandiae)

The White-faced Heron (Egretta novaehollandiae) is found throughout Australia as well as Indonesia, New Guinea, New Caledonia and New Zealand.

( White-faced heron  - Click the play button)

2.  Mole Cricket - Gryllotalpa sp and its Chirping Call
 
Well it's not all birds and furry animals around here. I like the creepy crawlies too. These alien like Mole crickets spend most of their lives underground and are heard more often than seen. They will sometimes come to the surface after heavy rain or you might come across one while digging in the garden. In summer, at dusk, you can hear them chirping from their underground burrows. The opening of the burrow actually amplifies the sound. Most are omnivorous.   This one is of the genus Gryllotalpa. The sound recording in the background is of a mole cricket calling from its underground burrow. I was testing out my new Zoom H4n Pro Mic. If the sound annoys you just turn it down :-)


(Mole cricket - Click the play button)




Thank You!
Since September I've gone from about 12 subscribers on my YouTube channel to over 210. Thank you all very much for your support and encouragement. If you have not yet subscribed please consider doing so, as not all of my videos appear on this blog. If you are logged in with your google account you simply need to use the YouTube/Subscribe button below.

I hope you enjoy the videos.


 Click the button below to subscribe to my YouTube Channel