Saturday, 29 October 2016

Lizards at War - White's Skink, Territorial Behaviour

There are several colonies of White's Skink (Egernia whitii) in the backyard and at the moment they are displaying territorial behavior. An old battle scarred specimen known as Stumpy (no tail) seems to be the lizard king.  Some lizards are chased away while in other cases it seems more about establishing the pecking order.  For example the young lizard seen in the video thumbnail below only moved about a metre away and has since crossed paths with stumpy without any altercations.






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Wednesday, 26 October 2016

So Why are Tasmanian Native-hens Known as Turbo Chooks?

The flightless Tasmanian Native-hen (Gallinula mortierii) belongs to the Rallidae family (rails, coots, swamphens). Colloquially they are referred to as the Turbo Chook.

So why is it called the Turbo Chook?  Watch the video to find out.




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Sunday, 23 October 2016

Black Swans and a Wascally Wabbit

This video shoes  a female Black Swan with four advanced cygnets. These were filmed at Pitcher Pde Reserve near Launceston, Tasmania.



On Friday morning I went out to film Humpback Whales. All I came home with was  some shots of this wascally wabbit eating daisies by a disused railway line :-)



The European Rabbit, Oryctolagus cuniculus, was introduced to Tasmania in the 1820s. The first feral populations were recorded in 1827 in south-eastern Tasmania. (Source: dpipwe)

The daisies are Capeweed, Arctotheca calendula. (Introduced from South Africa)
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Saturday, 15 October 2016

Royal spoonbill - Nest Building, Courtship, and Mating

This video shoes two Royal Spoonbills (Platalea regia) also known as the Black-billed spoonbill, engaged in nest building, courtship, and mating. The Royal spoonbill is quite uncommon in Tasmania with only a handful of birds around the state in recent years. 




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Friday, 7 October 2016

Pacific Gull - Courtship and Mating


This video shows the courtship and mating of the Pacific gull (Larus pacificus). The Pacific gull is the the largest of Tasmania's three gull species measuring 580mm - 650mm.






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Wednesday, 5 October 2016

Galah on a Wet and Windy Day


This video was taken from the comfort of a warm dry car while the weather raged outside. There were three Galahs (only one in the video) struggling in the wind while foraging for roots and shoots. Shortly after, they flew further along the coats - or maybe they blew along the coast - I'm not sure :-)


The  Galah is a member of the Cockatoo family, Cacatuidae, and is sometimes known as the Rose-breasted cockatoo. The one in the video is a female.





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